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Resources & Research for Hybrid Learning

Selected Readings


Starting in the spring of 2014, faculty from across disciplines participating in the Hybrid Challenge are invited to participate in faculty reading group discussions. These discussions are held approximately four times a semester where faculty share their insights on the texts with the group.

This list of selected resources is sorted by the academic year they were discussed.

*If you experience difficulty accessing any of the below resources, please contact a TRC staff member for assistance.

Spring 2014

Date Selected Readings Brief Description
February 5 Please read at least one article of your choice to discuss.
2014 NMC Horizon Report (Preview Edition) The New Media Consortium Horizon Project is a more than decade-long research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in higher education.
ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and IT, 2013 In 2013, ECAR collaborated with more than 250 higher education institutions to collect responses from more than 112,000 undergraduate students about their technology experiences and expectations.
February 24 Please read at least one article of your choice to discuss.
Effects of Active Learning on Enhancing Student Critical Thinking in an Undergraduate General Science Course (via UVa Library) To enhance students’ critical thinking in an undergraduate general science course, we designed and implemented active learning modules by incorporating group-based learning with authentic tasks, scaffolding, and individual reports. This study examined the levels of critical thinking students exhibited in individual reports and the students’ critical thinking level change over time.
What They Learned: Using Multimedia to Engage Undergraduates in Research Engaging undergraduate students in critical thinking is especially challenging in introductory courses. The advent of YouTube, inexpensive video cameras, and easy-to-use video editors provides opportunities to increase students’ skill levels in these areas.
March 18 Please read at least one article of your choice to discuss.
Engaging Learners in a Blended Course Chapter 3 from a brand-new book, Essentials for Blended Learning, provides context and broad encouragement for engaging learners in a flipped course. You might find some encouragement and ideas here. Hard copies of the text can be found at the TRC.
Effects of Small-Group Learning on Undergraduates in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology: A Meta-Analysis For those of you interested in a more quantitative research-based article you might take a look at this article from the Review of Educational Research.
April 7 Please read at least one article of your choice to discuss.
“What if students revolt?”- Considering Student Resistance: Origins, Options, and Opportunities for Investigation “What if the students revolt?” “What if I ask them to talk to a neighbor, and they simply refuse?” “What if they do not see active learning as teaching?” “What if they just want me to lecture?” “What if my teaching evaluation scores plummet?” “Even if I am excited about innovative teaching and learning, what if I encounter student resistance?”.
On the Validity of Student Evaluation of Teaching: The State of the Art This article provides an extensive overview of the recent literature on student evaluation of teaching (SET) in higher education. The review is based on the SET meta-validation model, drawing upon research reports published in peer-reviewed journals since 2000.
Miscellaneous Articles & resources that have been updated since the time of our reading, or resources introduced organically during our conversations.
2014 NMC Horizon Report (Full Version) The New Media Consortium Horizon Project is a more than decade-long research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in higher education.
Apple’s iTunes U You can use this link to explore material produced by UVa and publicly accessible via iTunes U.
The Uncommon Core (via UVa Library) The article discusses the United States’ Common Core State Standards for education, arguing that they do not adequately address creativity and technology. The author defines creativity in terms of the ability to create something original and useful and stresses the use of digital media in student creativity as of 2013.
Flipped Classes and Campus Tours from Inside Higher Ed “… Flipped classes were almost always talked about in the context of how great it is when a professor can spend individual time with students. How having access to online lecture material enables more classroom time to be spent going over difficult topics. How having the teaching materials online can make even larger introductory classes feel like smaller classes, as the professor is free to roam around and work with groups or individual students on the work being done during the class session….”
State U Online “… online learning is increasingly becoming a permanent fixture in higher education. But the nation’s public higher education system–the two-year colleges and four-year universities that educate the large majority of all college students–has been visibly slower to embrace the potential of online education. Many of these institutions were founded with a mission to serve their citizens, including those unable to attend in residence. Yet even as the technological means to achieve this goal reaches new heights, many public universities are shying away from the challenge. ….”
‘Introduction to Ancient Rome,’ the Flipped Version Jennifer Ebbeler teaches a 400 student “Introduction to Ancient Rome” at the University of Texas-Austin, and offers the following advice to first time flippers…
How the inverted classroom works: A manifesto for students Robert Talbert, a mathematician at Grand Valley State University, created “A Manifesto for Students”, after his students’ expressed “a lot of uncertainty and sometimes strongly negative responses.” It is an interesting document that lays out his reasons for flipping.
Teaching with Technology Vol. 2 This website presents a collection of peer-reviewed essays by individuals who have integrated technology into university courses. The writing is practically oriented, focusing on ways in which technology has helped students learn, and the content spans many technologies and disciplines.
6 Myths of the Flipped Classroom In many of our discussions about flipped course design we explore student and faculty concerns. This article attempts to dispel some of the myths around flipped classrooms in foster a deeper conversation.