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Lindsay Wheeler

Assistant Director of STEM Education Initiatives and Assistant Professor

Lindsey WheelerLindsay Wheeler joined the Center for Teaching Excellences in summer 2016. As Assistant Director of STEM Education Initiatives and Assistant Professor, Lindsay develops and implements educational development programs and courses to support teaching and learning in science, engineering and mathematics departments across the university.  Lindsay works with both faculty and teaching assistants (TAs) in STEM disciplines to support effective integration of research-based practices into their teaching.  She also seeks to increase collaboration of faculty, staff, and administrators across departments and schools to help improve the diversity and preparedness of students majoring STEM.

Lindsay’s research utilizes a mixed methods approach to examine how instructors in STEM disciplines impact student outcomes. Currently, she is the co-Director of a University-wide observation and survey project to understand STEM classroom practices and barriers to using active learning strategies in instruction. In collaboration with the Curry School of Education and four science departments, Lindsay has received Jefferson Trust and National Science Foundation grants to support her work transforming introductory laboratory courses and preparation of graduate students for teaching in chemistry, astronomy, physics and biology departments.

She has presented and published her educational development and science education work at regional, national, and international conferences and in peer reviewed journals. She is an active member in the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST), Association for Science Teacher Education (ASTE), and the POD Network, where she serves on committees, supports annual conferences, and reviews research manuscripts.  Lindsay, Michael Palmer, and Itiya Anicee received the Robert J. Menges Award for Outstanding Research in Educational Development from the POD Network in 2015 for the research examining students’ perceptions of syllabi.

Lindsay’s teaching interests include implementing inclusive and reflective teaching practices, developing and utilizing inquiry-based curricula, supporting TAs in instruction, and implementing active learning strategies in large-enrollment courses. She has taught large introductory chemistry laboratory courses, small foundational chemistry courses, and teaching seminar courses to graduate and undergraduate students in the sciences.

A native Virginian, Lindsay graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University with a B.S. in chemistry and a B.S. in forensic science. Lindsay received her M.A. in chemistry and M.A. in teaching from the University of Virginia. She taught high school chemistry before returning to the University of Virginia to obtain her Ph.D. in science education. In 2014, Lindsay won the All-University Graduate Teaching Assistant award for Math, Sciences, and Engineering.

Lindsay’s Complete CV

Educational Development Awards

  • 2015 Robert J. Menges Award for Outstanding Research in Educational Development, with Michael Palmer and Itiya Aneece. Not Your Granddaddy’s Syllabus: Investigating Student Perceptions of Course Syllabi.

Recent Publications

  • Whitworth, B.A., & Wheeler, L.B. (In review). Engineering or not?
  • Palmer, M.P., Wheeler, L.B., & Aneece, I.P. (In review).  Does the document matter? The role of syllabi in higher education.
  • Wheeler, L.B., Maeng, J.L., & Whitworth, B.A. (In review).  Factors influencing changes in Inquiry-based chemistry laboratory teaching assistants’ knowledge and beliefs
  • Wheeler, L.B., Maeng, J.L., Chiu, J.L., & Bell, R.L. (Accepted). Do teaching assistants matter? Investigating relationships between teaching assistants and student outcomes in undergraduate science laboratory classes. Journal of Research in Science Teaching.
  • Wheeler, L.B., Chiu, J.L., & Grisham, C.M. (2016).  Computational methods in general chemistry: Perceptions of programming, prior experience, and student outcomes. Journal of College Science Teaching, 45, 3, 83-91.
  • Wheeler, L.B., Maeng, J.L., & Whitworth, B.A. (2015).  Teaching assistants perceptions of a training to support an inquiry-based general chemistry laboratory course. Chemical Education Research and Practice, 16, 824-842.  DOI: 10.1039/c5rp00104h
  • Wheeler, L.B., Bell, R.L., Whitworth, B.A., & Maeng, J.L. (2015).  The science ELF: Assessing the Enquiry Levels Framework as a heuristic for professional development. International Journal of Science Education, 1, 55-81. DOI:10.1080/09500693.2014.961182

Select Invited Workshops & Lectures

  • Why is Teaching Important? Impact of Teaching Assistants on Students and Self. A keynote address for University of Nebraska-Lincoln Teaching Assistant Orientation, August 16, 2016.
  • A Workshop for Faculty Developers in using COPUS for faculty observations. An invited workshop for the Center for Faculty Innovation. James Madison University, July 13, 2016.
Select Conference Presentations

  • Wheeler, L.B., & Gonczi, A.L. (submitted). Ability beliefs of students in an undergraduate chemistry inquiry context: Their role in mediating student attitudes and learning. A paper for the Annual Meeting of the Association for Science Teacher Education, Des Moines, IA.
  • Wheeler, L.B., & Palmer, M. (accepted). Development and Implementation of Observational Studies to Assess Classroom Practices. A paper for the Annual POD Network Conference, Louisville, KY (November, 2016).
  • Wheeler, L.B., Maeng, J.L., Chiu, J.L., & Bell, R.L. (April, 2016). Do teaching assistants matter? Assessment of teaching assistants impact on student outcomes in a general chemistry laboratory. A paper for the Annual Meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Baltimore, MD.
  • Wheeler, L.B., Chiu, J.L., Maeng, J.L., & Bell, R.L. (January, 2016). Inquiry-based professional development for general chemistry laboratory teaching assistants: Changes in teaching assistants’ knowledge, beliefs and confidence. A paper for the Annual Meeting of the Association for Science Teacher Education, Reno, NV.
  • Palmer, M.P., Wheeler, L.B., & Aneece, I.P. (November, 2015). Not Your Granddaddy’s Syllabus: Investigating Student Perceptions of Course Syllabi.  A paper for the Annual POD Network Conference, San Francisco, CA.
  • Wheeler, L.B., Maeng, J.L., & Whitworth, B.A. (April, 2015). Assessing a Professional Development for Teaching Assistants in a Project-Based Guided Inquiry General Chemistry Lab. A paper for the Annual Meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Chicago, IL.

Recent Courses Taught

  • CHEM 7011/BIOL 7110/PHYS 9030: Teaching Science in Higher Education
  • CHEM 2559/BIOL 2900: Teaching Methods for Undergraduate TAs
  • CHEM 1411/1421: Intro to College Chemistry Lab
  • CHEM 1611/1621: Intro to College Chemistry for Engineers Lab
  • CHEM 1400: Foundations of Chemical Principles